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Home / Latest News / Cardiff drug dealer’s ‘kindness’ led to hostel drug death, court hears

Cardiff drug dealer’s ‘kindness’ led to hostel drug death, court hears

A man has been jailed for giving a neighbour drugs which killed her.

Cardiff Crown Court heard Anthony Lyndon Jones, 37, was only trying to help out the woman who lived in the same hostel in Roath.

But Stella Parfitt was found lying lifeless on a mattress in her room at the Emerald Street property on April 1.

A post mortem revealed the cause of death to be methadone toxicity, said prosecutor Gareth James.

“Two empty bottles with his prescription details were found. Ms Parfitt had been dead for about 12 hours.”

She was discovered by a project worker at the property which houses people with alcohol, drug or mental health issues.

Mr James said: “He tried to shake her awake but she was cold and police were called. The project worker and the defendant appeared to be in shock.”

Both Jones and the dead woman were said to be tragic figures, with problems.

She suffered from drink issues which had in the past caused her to be hospitalised because of seizures and he was described as being vulnerable and a victim of bullying by others.

Jeff Jones, defending, said Jones had also been addicted to drugs for years and was prescribed methadone by doctors.

Monday to Friday he went to the Cardiff Royal Infirmary to take his daily dose but on weekends was given two bottles to take away.

An March 28 this year, he was handed four bottles because it was the Easter bank holiday and he needed the medication to see him through until the clinic reopened.

“His motive was one of kindness, to be helpful but there were tragic consequences,” Mr Jones told the court.

“He is a pathetic and timid man who has also been receiving treatment for depression since the age of 16 but who had found some stability at that home.”

The barrister said Jones’ regret and remorse were genuine.

His monthly anti-psychotic injection which he receives from the community health team, will continue while he is in prison.

He pleaded guilty to a charge of supplying a class A drug and was given 30 months.

The Crown Prosecution Service said there had not been a more serious charge brought because the drug had been taken voluntarily and there had been no financial gain for Jones.

He had been honest with police from the outset, telling them he had not taken his medication that day but instead had given it to Ms Parfitt.

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